Robbie Padovano and Theo Bradley answer media questions during an Aug. 17 media event at the Real World house — Ballou Wright  building — in Capitol Hill.
Robbie Padovano and Theo Bradley answer media questions during an Aug. 17 media event at the Real World house — Ballou Wright building — in Capitol Hill.
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Editor’s Note: Since covering the MTV Real World Seattle media day, MTV has released the concept and previews for the show’s 32nd season. Real World Seattle: Bad Blood features a twist, where cast members are forced to share their living quarters with former exes and bullies for a period of time. 

MTV will air its 32nd season of Real World on Oct. 12, showing how seven East Coast 20-somethings managed to coexist for two months in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood.

The cable network, once popular for music videos, hosted an Aug. 17 media event at the Ballou Wright Building on 12th Avenue, where the Real World cast had been staying since June. This was the first time the reality show has filmed in Seattle since Season 7, when the cast lived at Pier 70. 

The Capitol Hill Times had to wait until MTV lifted its media embargo to publish this article. 

Most mornings started off with a trip to the gym, said Anika “Everyone works out and everyone eats good,” said Theo Bradley, 23, of Kankakee Illinois. 

With four women in the house, it would take a few hours for everyone to get ready for the day, said 23-year-old Katrina Stack of Micanopy, Florida, and then try to agree with housemates on what to do around Seattle.

Walker applied to be on the Real World online, while Stack traveled 100 miles to Orlando for a casting tryout.

The two bunked together at the Capitol Hill Real World house. 

While Bradley said he felt the cast “got past the Seattle Freeze,” businesses had the option whether to let the Real World crew film in their establishments, and not everyone was willing to sign off on that.

Plans to film the 32nd season of the Real World had been public knowledge for several weeks before the cast and crew arrived. While being followed with cameras around the city, cast members said people around them were respectful, but curious. 

New Yorker Mike Crescenzo said he liked walking alongside people, to get a reaction.

The cast was dropped into a Black Lives Matter protest on Aug. 9, said 21-year-old Jordan Anderson, which started downtown and looped through Capitol Hill, including in front of Mayor Ed Murray’s home.